Ktema Terpnon

Apr 03

bluhamuhr:

look at this baby on his specially made baby horse

Going on the registry 

bluhamuhr:

look at this baby on his specially made baby horse

Going on the registry 

(via beatonna)

Apr 02

[video]

Mar 30

At least it’s not a ferret?

At least it’s not a ferret?

(Source: adjst)

Mar 05

ilovecharts:

The Dinosaur Pet Guide 
by johnconway, via bradct

ilovecharts:

The Dinosaur Pet Guide 

by johnconway, via bradct

(Source: comicsodissey, via wnycradiolab)

Feb 04

I want to fall into this for eternity. 
We’re very focused on comfort today.

I want to fall into this for eternity. 

We’re very focused on comfort today.

(Source: relicnyc, via ffactory)

Most satisfying picture of the Super Bowl

Most satisfying picture of the Super Bowl

Jan 27

[video]

“The Latin term meconium derives from the Greek μηκώνιον, mēkōnion, a diminutive of μήκων, mēkōn, i.e. poppy, in reference either to its tarry appearance that may resemble some raw opium preparations, or to Aristotle’s belief that it induces sleep in the fetus.” — Sometimes it’s great when Greek etymology intersects with my current life, and other times less so.

Jan 16

“Things to which I’ve had intense emotional reactions today:” —

And it’s only 9:30 a.m. 

Jan 14

new-aesthetic:

"The Male Gazed: Surveillance, Power, and Gender” By Kate Losse at Model View Culture

Government surveillance within social networks didn’t arise out of nowhere; instead, it is a product of longstanding inequalities in power in technology that have historically privileged white men above all, who have been much more likely to control surveillance technologies than be targeted by them. The outrage over NSA surveillance has occurred and received massive coverage not because the deployment of technology for citizen surveillance is new but because white, technical, American men have finally become targets of the surveillant gaze rather than its aloof masters.

new-aesthetic:

"The Male Gazed: Surveillance, Power, and Gender” By Kate Losse at Model View Culture

Government surveillance within social networks didn’t arise out of nowhere; instead, it is a product of longstanding inequalities in power in technology that have historically privileged white men above all, who have been much more likely to control surveillance technologies than be targeted by them. The outrage over NSA surveillance has occurred and received massive coverage not because the deployment of technology for citizen surveillance is new but because white, technical, American men have finally become targets of the surveillant gaze rather than its aloof masters.